Engine Management System Information

(derived from 675 manual, other models may vary)

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System Description (675)


Goto Speed Triple T509 (885 cc) & 955cc   Goto Speed Triple 955i model 2002 - 2004

Goto  Speed Triple 1050     Goto  Rocket III

The Daytona 675 is fitted with an electronic engine management system which encompasses control of both ignition and fuel delivery. The electronic control module (ECM) draws information from sensors positioned around the engine, cooling and air intake systems and precisely calculates ignition advance and fueling requirements for all engine speeds and loads.

In addition, the system has an on-board diagnostic function. This ensures that, should a malfunction occur in the engine management system, the malfunction type, and engine data at the time the malfunction occurred, are stored in the ECM memory. This stored data can then be recovered using a special service tool which is mandatory for all Triumph dealers. In this way, precise diagnosis of a fault can be made and the fault quickly rectified.

System Sensors  (varies by year and model)

Intake air temperature sensor

Situated  in the top of the airbox. As the density of the air (and therefore the amount of oxygen available to ignite the fuel) changes with temperature, an intake air temperature sensor is fitted. Changes in air temperature (and therefore air density) are compensated for by adjusting the amount of fuel injected to a level consistent with clean combustion and low emissions. 

Barometric pressure sensor

Situated  behind the cockpit and below the instrument pack. The barometric pressure sensor measures atmospheric air pressure. With this information, the amount of fuel injected is adjusted to suit the prevailing conditions.

Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor

Situated  to the left side of the airbox, connected to each of the three throttle bodies by equal length tubes. The MAP sensor provides information to the ECM which is used at shallow throttle angles (very small throttle openings) to provide accurate engine load indications to the ECM. This degree of engine load accuracy allows the ECM to make very small adjustments to fuel and ignition which would otherwise not be possible from throttle angle data alone.

Clutch switch

Situated  on the clutch lever. The clutch must be pulled in for the starter motor to operate.

Crankshaft position sensor

Situated  in the alternator cover. The crankshaft position sensor detects movement of teeth attached to the alternator rotor. The toothed rotor gives a reference point from which the actual crankshaft position is calculated. The crankshaft position sensor information is used by the ECM to determine engine speed and crankshaft position in relation to the point where fuel is injected and ignition of the fuel occurs.

Engine coolant temperature sensor

Situated  at the rear of the cylinder head. Coolant temperature information, received by the ECM, is used to optimise fueling at all engine temperatures and to calculate hot and cold start fueling requirements.

Throttle position sensor

Situated at right end of the throttle body. Used to relay throttle position information to the ECM. Throttle opening angle is used by the ECM to determine fueling and ignition requirements for all throttle positions.

Road speed sensor

Situated  in the upper crankcase, in front of the engine breather. The road speed sensor provides the ECM with data from which road speed is calculated and displayed on the speedometer.

Lambda sensor

Situated  in the exhaust header system upstream of the catalyst. The lambda sensor constantly feeds information to the ECM on the content of the exhaust gases. Based on this information, adjustments to the air/fuel ratio are made.

Side stand switch

Situated  at the top of the sidestand leg. If the sidestand is in the down position, the engine will not run unless the transmission is in neutral.

Gear position sensor

Situated  in the upper crankcase, behind the gearbox output sprocket cover, on the left hand side of the engine. The gear position sensor provides the ECM with selected gear information. This is used to prevent the engine from starting if the transmission is in gear. The sensor also provides information to the gear position indicator and the neutral lamp in the instruments.

Fall detection switch

Situated  below the instrument pack. The fall detection switch will detect if the motorcycle is on its side and will cut power to the ECM immediately. This prevents the engine from running and the fuel pump from delivering fuel. In the event of a fall, the switch is reset by returning the bike to an upright position and switching the ignition off then back on again.

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System Actuators  (varies by year and model)

In response to signals received from the sensors, the ECM controls and directs messages to a series of electronic and electro-mechanical actuators. The function and location of the actuators is given below.

Throttle stepper motor

Situated  between cylinders two and three of the throttle bodies. The throttle stepper actuates a cam/lever which causes variations in the closed throttle position. Although used primarily to ensure target idle speed is maintained, it also increases throttle opening when the engine is cold.

Canister purge valve (California models only)

Situated  in the vapour return lire between the carbon canister and the throttle bodies. The purge valve controls the return of vapour which has been stored in the carbon canister during the period when the engine is switched off. The valve is 'pulsed' by the ECM to give control over the rate at which the canister is purged.

Injectors

Located on the throttle body. The engine is fitted with three injectors. The spray pattern of the injectors is fixed but the length of time each injector can remain open is variable according to operating conditions. The duration of each injection is calculated by the ECM using data received from the various sensors in the system.

Ignition coils

Plug-top coils are located in the cam cover. There are three coils fitted, one for each spark plug. The ECM controls the point at which the coils are switched on and off. In calculating the switch-on time, the ECM allows sufficient time for the coils to charge to a level where a spark can be produced. The coils are switched off at the point of ignition, the timing of which is optimised for good engine performance.

EMS main relay

Situated  forward of the fuse box. When the ignition is switched on, the EMS main relay is powered up to provide a stable voltage supply for the ECM. When the ignition is turned off, the ECM carries out a power down sequence during which the EMS main relay remains powered by the ECM for 1 minute. The ECM power down sequence includes: writing the adaption data to ECM memory and referencing the position of the throttle stepper motor.

Fuel pump

Located inside the fuel tank. The electric pump delivers fuel into the fuel system, via a pressure regulator, at a constant 3 bar pressure. The pump is run continuously when the engine is operating and is also run briefly when the ignition is first switched on to ensure that 3 bar is available to the system as soon as the engine is cranked. Fuel pressure is controlled by a regulator also Situated  inside the fuel tank.

Cooling fan

Located behind the radiator. The ECM controls switching on and off of the cooling fan in response to a signal received from the coolant temperature sensor. When the coolant temperature rises to a level where the cooling effect of natural. airflow is insufficient, the cooling fan is turned on by the ECM. When the coolant temperature falls sufficiently, the ECM turns the cooling fan off. The fan only becomes operational when the engine is running. It will not operate at any other time.

Secondary air injection solenoid

Located forward of the airbox, on the left hand side of the air intake. The secondary air injection solenoid controls airflow through the secondary air injection system.

Intake air flap

Located in the air intake, between the headlamps. The purpose of the intake air flap is to improve low down power delivery. The intake air flap is closed up to 4500 rpm and 12 degrees of throttle, above which it opens.

Exhaust butterfly valve

Located in the exhaust headers downstream of the Lambda sensor. The purpose of the exhaust valve is to improve low down power delivery. At idle, the exhaust valve is 30% open, rising to approximately 50°/a open at 4500 rpm, and fully open at 7000 rpm and above. The profile that the exhaust valve follows has been designed to give no reduction of torque at full throttle.

Note:

In this system, the starter lockout system (clutch switch, gear position sensor, sidestand switch) all operate through the engine management ECM.

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